Thursday, December 3, 2009

About Sheri Of TwigTalk

Hello I'm Sheri's/Twigs Daughter Shani ,

Early Monday evening Mom fell Shattering her left arm Elbow &Ulna bone & Broke her left ankle I believe the Fibula bone .
She was hospitalized She had to have surgery to repair the damage done to the arm luckily they had all the pieces of the shattered arm to piece back together . her leg was a clean break which did not require any surgery just a casting .She came home on Wednesday afternoon and has been ordered bed resting They have put castes on both broken parts.
Due to these breaks she will be unble to post here for an unknown amount of time .
So this site will be on hold until she has recovered fully from this fall.


She Thanks everyone for the well wishes via blog comments as well as group & emails.
She hopes to get back here as quick as possible .
But until such time Twig Talk is on Hiatus .

Thank you for understanding and keep those well wishes coming .

I'll be checking blog post comments daily until the time she is able to return .


Sincerely
Sheri's Daughter and Secretary
Shani

Sunday, November 29, 2009

Scanning And Other Adventures

I finished scanning my treasures. Took longer as I had to examine each one as I went. Such a wonderful bag of treasure it was too. Though I did miss ScanFest. I don't get very much work done when I do make it to the event. Too busy reading and chatting, I'm afraid. Sunday seems to be a busy day lately, for me.

Out of my bag of treasure I also have a yearbook to add to the collection on the county site. 1948-49 Jr. High yearbook to be exact. One problem I am having is getting the pages sized without making a mess of the photos. When I run them through Irfanview as I have with all of the others, the photos become heavily dotted. You cannot see the pictures good enough to make out anyone. The entire yearbook is on a bad quality paper. It is only printed on one side and the photos are all class photos, not individual ones as most are. So some experimenting is called for to try to fix the photos while taking most of the weight out of them. One page averages 10MB or so. I need to have them under 200KB and smaller yet readable.

There are many newspaper clippings, most are dated. How lucky is that?! Also my mother's grade school report cards! Those were fun.

The big one was the 1959 guide to Disneyland! We went to California and stayed quite a while with my aunt in San Bernardino the summer of 1959. I got to go to Disneyland. I remembered the trip but didn't know the guide existed. It didn't have any genealogical purpose other than it brought back many wonderful memories of the trip.

Now to get them all organized. . . . . . .

Sunday, November 22, 2009

New Treasure


It's been a lovely week for treasure. My Mother handed me a bag of things she had found while going through a closet. Lovely mess, isn't it? There is so much more. So, want to guess what is on my To Do list next week? Give you a hint. . . . has something to do with the scanner. . . . It's certainly been fun going through it all. She had many things from my childhood, but most surprising was that there were many items from hers. At any rate, I am going to be busy, and happy about it!

Sunday, November 15, 2009

Kreativ Blogger Award from Dr. Bill Smith


Thank you Dr. Bill Smith [http://drbilltellsancestorstories.blogspot.com/] for visiting my blog and choosing to give this award to me.
The winner of this award is supposed to list seven things about themselves and then pass the award along to seven other bloggers.

1. I never get tired of researching and often wish I had more time to devote to it.

2. I have thoroughly enjoyed my time with the INGenWeb and taking care of my county site.

3. I also research the paranormal and spirituality. I have done that much longer than family history, as a matter of fact. Recent discoveries have made me feel a sense of 'coming full circle'.

4. I have worked piled up to do that would shock you!

5. I love to quilt but haven't for a long time now. Where does the time go??

6. I dislike the telephone. No further comment on that....

7. I'm getting old. I must be. It is 9:00 p.m. and I am sleepy.


My picks:
1. Ancestors Live Here

2. Earline at Ancestral Notes

3. A Couple of Bubbles Off Center

4. Banjos And Baby Dolls

5. Genealogy Lines

6. Random Relatives

7. Raeburn Family Odyssey

Thursday, November 12, 2009

Treasure Chest Thursday - Grandma's Recipes


I did not know this box existed. It was my grandmother's (Della M. Jaynes) recipe box. She mostly didn't use recipes, so I was surprised when my Mother showed this to me.

I don't know yet what I am going to do with all of these. I've barely had time to go through them. Most are written out in her hand, some are from ladies she from her church and some cut from magazines and ready to fall apart.
So my treasure this time is a new find. That is always exciting!!
Anyone have suggestions? What would you do with them?

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Friday, October 30, 2009

Looking Into the Eyes of Old Tom At Last!

Last Halloween I participated in a Carnival called "Fact or Fiction?" (Carnival of Genealogy -58th Edition / October 12, 2008) with an article called, "The Eyes of Old Tom" . In my article I wrote about George Thomas Jaynes, "Old Tom", my great-grandfather, and all the things attributed to him. I have so many interviews about him from people that knew him well, that I could not just dismiss the stories. There were 4 things that were in each, independant interview:
1. He could make tables walk.
2. He (and others in the room with him) could hear knocking.
3. People wanted him to do these things.
and of the course the biggie:
4. He was making a table walk and it was struck by lightning in the middle of the room on a clear day which made him give up whatever he was doing.
And then there also was the pity my grandmother felt for him being 'driven practically crazy' by the unwelcome knocking for the rest of his life.

Another interesting thing is the fact that he was not listed as having a job in any record until the 1910 census where he is listed as a fireman at the mill. Interviews also had him not working at a job, but providing for his family.

So, what do you do when you want to find out if such a thing like table walking and knocking have a name and what purpose either could serve? Well, you google it, of course! And, no surprise to me, these things do have names: table tipping and rapping. What was a surprise to me was that they both are attributed to mediumship. You know, seances and spirits. I probably shouldn't have been surprised considering my enduring and avid curiosity about such things all my life, but I was. Now it seems it was obvious and I should have seen it all along. But I didn't. I won't say whether I am just a brick shy of a load or just consider that an ancestor of mine is expected to be kind of boring, but I did give some thought to both.

Let's start with some history on the subject.

The entire era of spiritualism and mediumship seems to start with the Fox sisters, Leah, Maggie and Katie about 1848 in New York. The claimed to 'talk' to spirits in their home as children through tapping, so many taps for yes and so many for no, as they asked questions of the spirits. Later in life Maggie confessed to it all being fake after becoming very religious. She later said she had lied about claiming it was fake, but by then they were all suspect. There were many frauds that have been documented from the early days, and the label could probably be applied to most of them if truth be told. But, there were a number of notable mediums that came out of the era of 1860 to the 1930's and even to the present day. One of my favorites, which I had studied many years ago, was Edgar Cayce aka The Sleeping Prophet. I simply had not put together Cayce's trance/dream work with my Old Toms' "table-walking" and "knocking". There are many forms of mediumship which I did not know about.

Attempts to communicate with the dead has been documented back to very early history. One that comes to mind easily is the story of the Witch of Endor, who raised the spirit of the dead Samuel so that Saul could question him about a battle. (I Samuel 28:8-25 Old Testament). Communicating with spirits is an old practice.

Arthur Conana Doyle, Harry Houdini and even Abraham Lincoln were all believers. Lincoln, remember, had his 'dreams', and everyone knows how Harry Houdini spent so many hours with medium after medium trying to contact his mother. (Not to mention the hours and years he spent in the after-life trying to contact his living wife through a medium. Some stories say he did, some say he didn't.) Hmmmmmm.

In the very late 1800's and early 1900's, the 'home seance' was all the rage. I should image many were little more than dramatic theater, kind of like renting a movie on the weekend. This was the birth of the 'professional medium'. Everyone was interested in psychic phenomena. Money was to be made. Here in Indiana there was the creation of Camp Chesterfield in 1886, just outside Indy. It was one of the most popular and well known Spiritualist camps in the country, with visitors coming from as far away as California. It is still home to the Indiana Association of Spiritualists. Yep, big business!

What I had been told over and over in interviews about old Tom was his 'walking a table', which was actually called table tipping. It was a way for the participants through the medium, to talk to the spirits. Everyone would sit around the table, each resting their hands on the top. Then, depending on the strength of the medium (or his 'special effects') the table would vibrate, move and tip from leg to leg in response to questions. It would probably look as though it was "walking".

Allan Kardac in "The Medium's Book" wrote:
"The qualities of mediums are various. The medianimic power is sometimes very strong, producing strongly marked effects; a single individual who is really a powerful medium often producing more effect, alone, than twenty others united. If such a one lays his hands on the table for an instant, it immediately begins to move, rising up, turning over, spinning round with great velocity, or performing a variety of irregular and often violent motions."

Another thing that was said over and over in the interviews was the 'knocking'. It was said it "just about drove old Tom crazy all the rest of his life". That is called "rapping", and it is the way a spirit tries to communicate with a person. It is not something 'conjoured' by a medium, but in one source I read, it was often the sign of a 'real' medium.

I spent many hours pouring over articles and books on the subject (a tiny few are listed below). When I was done I realized there was no way, short of a seance, that I could prove any of it. But there is a feeling, deep inside, that tells me I have almost solved this mystery. I am as sure as I can be that George Thomas "Old Tom" Jaynes was a professional spiritual medium. The only thing I haven't answered is the lightning incident. Only he can tell me about that one.

All I have to leave for those that come after me are the stories and a few historical facts. But I know.......

Then again, perhaps I could interview him.

I could use some help around the table. Join me, anyone?

George Thomas "Old Tom" Jaynes
October 15, 1869 - March 15, 1954

**************************

The Mediums' Book by Allan Kardec
1861
translated by Anna Blackwell 1876
Quote from Page 59 Physical Manifestations. - Table-Turning

The Birth Of Spiritualism – The Story Of The Fox Sisters

Table Tipping
Popular Past Time of the Home Spirit Circles

The Seance
Communicating with the Spirits

Medium - from Wikipedia

Camp Chesterfield, Indiana

Edgar Cayce's A.R.E.
Association for Research and Enlightenment
215 67th Street, Virginia Beach, VA 23451

Thursday, October 29, 2009

Treasure Chest Thursday - Grandpa's Fountain Pen

James "Jim" Jaynes was my grandfather. He was a plumber. He had his own plumbing business which he ran out of the house. As children my brother and I loved to go through the trash basket that he kept beside his desk. It was always filled with unopened mail full of wonderful things. Local businesses would send him ink pens, tablets, rulers, little pocket gadgets and other little things with their advertising on the items. It was a treasure chest to a child. He always made sure there was plenty to open when we visited.
He often sat there doing his business which included a lot of paperwork. His fountain pen fascinated me. He showed me how to fill it by dipping into the bottle of ink and pulling the little lever.
It was a great joy to find he had kept that pen for so many years. I am lucky to have it in my little chest of treasures. It brings a good memory when I catch site of it.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday - Cora Hines Abbott Jaynes


Born: March 8, 1870 Neoga, Cumberland County, Illinois
Died: December 21, 1948 Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana
Buried: Chestnut Ridge Cemetery, Jackson County, Indiana

Monday, October 26, 2009

Madness Monday - Abbott and Hines

I may have finally solved the Abbott mystery. Well, in reality, I may just be a little closer to the answer. This is not about ancestors suffering from madness, but the madness of trying to solve all the mysteries of this twig on my tree.

First of all I went to the Health Department where the original death records are to see if the "infant" Abbott listed in the WPA was my little guy. It was not. I was pretty sure it couldn't be before, now I am sure. Now I am doubting that his name was Percy at all. I am certain that he lived, just re-examining his death and his name.

First of all the story was that Cora Hines married an Abbott man who was a lot older than her. She had 2 children with him, Edna Catharine (Katy) which I have found, and a child who everyone thought was named Percy and died as a child. He had been a sickly child all his life and supposedly 'laid down on the floor and died' one day. But perhaps the story got turned around a little, and I know that deaths were not required to be registered until 1902, and what do I have left? Well, a child, perhaps a child just at the crawling age, still considered an infant, and a name, Percy Abbott. I also know that Cora divorced Mr. Abbott, date unknown, and the reason given was that he was abusive.

So I decided to be wild. :o) At FamilySearch I put in Percy Abbott, any spelling, date; 1850 - 1900 in Indiana. I got 2 entries. One was not even a close fit and the name was Pery, not Percy. The second was Percy Abbett, born Aug 1834, 66 years old, residing about 2 miles from my current residence, White, Male, DIVORCED (as per 1900 census, Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana). This entry made me stop. It could be the child was named for the father, Percy is not a common name. Or perhaps Percy was the fathers name in the first place and it just got lost in the retelling of the story.

I wish I could put this one behind me. It is driving me to madness. Though I do feel I am closer. If I can find some evidence of the marriage or divorce I will feel better.

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday - Dee and Lottie Jaynes



As you can see from the dates on Dee, he lived to be 101. Dee was a Miller and worked and lived in Indianapolis for a time, working as head miller at a Acme-Evans Mill there. They are buried in Riverview Cemetery in Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana.

Sunday, September 27, 2009

The Life of Mr. William 'Bill' Hays Alexander

William Hays Alexander, aka."Bill", was born May 11, 1880 in Jackson County, Indiana. He was the youngest of 4 children. His parents were John and Margaret "Amanda" Atkins Alexander.

He married Olive "Ollie" Ellen Martin on Dec. 28, 1902 in Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana. Children; Della Mae, Gladys, Merrill Harris, Lucille D., Opal Louise, William H., Norma.

He was my great-grandfather through his eldest daughter, Della Mae.

In 1912 the City Directory he and his family living at 418 N. Pine Street in Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana.

In his 1918 according to his Military Registration Card, he was living in Crothersville in Jackson County working as a truck driver for Harlan W. White who had a grocery there. He was listed as tall and of slender build, his eyes and hair light brown. In 1920 he was working as a Mechanic at a local Seymour garage.

His father was a farmer but he apparently had no interest in farming.



He was a member of the Order of Redmen and Haymakers. They watched over and helped his family, even planned and paid his death expenses. You can see their 1909 rule book here on the Jackson County INGenWeb site: Chicakeith Improved Order of Redmen Tribe 405

It was a very active group in the city during his lifetime. He was very involved with the group all his life.

He died on October 10, 1928 of Bright's Disease. He was only 48 years old. Bright's disease was named Dr. Richard Bright who first described it. It is a progressive kidney disease that did not respond to any treatments of the day which included bloodletting. It was a terribly painful way to die. Today the disease can treated.

OBITUARY:
Seymour Tribune - October 10, 1928

William Alexander Dies Early Monday Had Been Ill for Past Six Months Suffering of Bright’s Disease Rites: 2 p. m. Wednesday.

William Alexander, age 48, of Glenlawn, died at 3 o’clock this morning at his home, 704 Euclid avenue, following an illness of six months. Death was caused by Bright’s disease.

Mr. Alexander was born in Jackson county May 11, 1880, and had lived in the county all his life. He was married in 1902 to Miss Ollie Martin, of near Brownstown. He was affiliated with the Seymour order of Redmen and Haymakers. The former will be in charge of the funeral services which will be held at the First Baptist church at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon, with the Rev. A.. Cohn officiating. Burial will be in Riverview cemetery.

The body is in state at the Tower funeral parlors where friends may call between 6 and 9 o’clock this evening. Besides the widow, Mr. Alexander is survived by seven children, Mrs. Della Jaynes, of Seymour; Mrs. Gladys Mails, of Indianapolis; Merill, Lucille, Opal, William Jr., and Norma, all living at home; and a sister, Mrs. Anna Fish, of Norman Station.

Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Abbott - The Great Mystery

My great-grandmother was married before she met my great-grandfather. Cora Hines was married to an Abbott. No one remembered his first name and I have not been able to find it. They could have married in Illinois, Ohio or possibly Switzerland, Jackson or Washington Counties in Indiana at an unknown date.

She was born March 8, 1870 in Cumberland County, Illinois. She married George Thomas "Old Tom" Jaynes September 11, 1896, at age 26. So sometime before that she married Mr. Abbott.
She had 2 children with Mr. Abbott. A daughter, Edna Catharine "Katy" Abbott was born May 9, 1892. She lived to be the ripe old age of 42, when she died of TB. I don't know whether their other child was born first or last. His name was Percy Abbott. He was said to be a sickly child, always weak and tired. The story was that he simply lay down on the floor one day and died. I have not found any evidence of the actual existance of this child. But he did exist.

A great-aunt said that both children were buried in Washington County, IN but Katy is buried beside her husband in Seymour, Jackson County, IN. So I have no idea where Percy was born, lived, died or buried. Very frustrating.

Cora and her parents lived for some time in Switzerland County, Indiana. They were George Washington and Agnes Joyce/Joice Hines. They both died in Neoga, Cumberland County, Illinois.

The only clue I have is a note I made many years ago. All it says is:

Seymour Weekly Democrat
Nov. 20, 1897
Percy Abbott

The library did not have that issue on microfilm. Is this about my Percy? I truly wish I had done a better job of sourcing my notes in those days. Let it be a lesson to all! You will not remember what it means and where you got it after 20 years has passed!!

At any rate the date would be about right. She was married to "Old Tom" when the child died.

Any Abbotts out there from the Illinois, Indiana, Ohio area?


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, July 26, 2009

July is Going to Be Remembered...

The first of this month my 14 year old niece ended up in the ER with a pain, which disappeared before they could do more than look at her. But on the safe side they did an x-ray. Something was watching over her. It was just an accidental finding. It didn't cause the pain. But it was cancer. Now, going into the last week of July with great relief, she is minus one kidney but recovering. Sounds like a simple thing, take it out and be done. But, of course, it isn't so simple. Nothing ever is. She is very brave. Very concerned about not upsetting her Mom and Dad. She is home now and on the mend.

Her life is forever changed. Probably the way she will look at life is changed. Her parents will never look at things the same either. I think such a crisis puts every thing into perspective for all that it touches. Suddenly the things you thought so important seem silly. The things you have put off seem so important. You look around you with refreshed vision, ready to see the small joys that come your way.

All in all it has been quite a month in just about every way. Not one I want to repeat, but that applies to all of my family. I will be glad to see it pass into history.

Sunday, July 19, 2009

Direction?

I haven't had much time to blog lately. There are important things that require me to be completely present in the real world now and then. This has been a summer filled with such things, both good and bad. Life changing things.

But to get to a genealogical point, a crisis in research. Well, sort of. I had someone tell me that they had increased my file over 3000 people just by going to ancestry and collecting leaves. This was only a 2-line file. I worked for years to verify and find my people. My complete file is just over 3000. I was sitting and contemplating the damage done by such an act and thought, "I used to really do research". What a surprising thought out of nowhere. Being online has made me lazy about research. It's easy to become a 'name collector' in the online tree environment. The newbies coming up know only that environment. They are encouraged to just click here and the work is done for you. No matter that the data is wrong. Thomas MacEntee at his blog just recently posted "How Big Is It? Quality Over Quantity" hitting a nerve for me. The thought about my research and my goals for my work has been in the back of my mind now for a while. Every day it pops up to be ruminated over some more. I am not sure where it is leading me.

Also there is the mess with GenealogyWise, the Ning driven network site belonging to WorldVitalRecords (a $$ site). Not a wise start at all, it seems. I have gotten many invites, including one surprisingly from the site itself. But I am exhausted by keeping sites going and spending so much time trying to keep up. We all need community and I certainly enjoy it but how much is too much? I really like Facebook and a few others and would like to keep them. So perhaps a small, manageable network will fill the need. At any rate, I was trampled in the (what I believe was an engineered) early stampede to the site as it was not even open at the time. No one waited to see what it was before the great mass joining. So I decided to watch. Now there is a rather useless mess of groups of every imaginable kind that I, as yet, cannot see being helpful. Perhaps I am blind to the direction this is going. At any rate I am rather happy I sat it out. I am referring to Terry Thornton and the problems with posts being taken down when they don't go the way of the GW owner. On top of that I was unable to get Terrys blog to load today. It has been removed too. I hope Mr. Thornton shut it down himself, and not GW with Blogger. Though it is beyond my understanding why he would remove so much data. If he didn't, perhaps after this post my time is limited here as well. Whatever the answer to the disappearance of the blogs, there is a distinct odor in the air.

The whole mess just emphasizes to me the need for me to decide and weed out the things I do not find useful in my quest to find my family. A plan and focus on one line might be in order. All those old goals need to be brought out and dusted off.

Twitter isn't as helpful as I had hoped. And I am interested in more than just genealogy. I don't see how I can 'talk' to one interest without it going out to all. That is not good. Perhaps the AdobeAir programs such as TweetDeck and TWhirl do that, and I have them on my computer, but I don't want to expend the huge resources that I found they need to run. So I haven't learned to use them. Slows down the whole process. Firefox is such a memory hog it is hard to run anything as hungry as it (Firefox is an addiction). In Twitterfox you have no options. So I need to figure out how to work with it or settle on just reading them. Very interesting tweets though. I do enjoy reading.

Sunday, June 14, 2009

I'm Late Again - Puckerbrush Award


I am late, as always. I was given this award some time ago. I won't say how long. But, I am only now finding enough time at one sitting to get it taken care of. Thank you Cheryl at HeritageHappens and Geni at Ginisology for giving me the award!

Now, I might not have been able to find the time to blog, but I was certainly thinking about what blogs have influenced over the years. I was reading blogs long before I gave it a try. Usually I try to find the newer blogs to give awards to in hopes of bringing them into the circle, but this time I will truly give this one to the blogs I go to most often. Some I consider learning experiences that everyone should have on the 'must visit often' list!

Randy Seaver of "Genea-Musings" was one of the first blogs I read. I have learned much from Mr. Seaver. He has an easy to follow writing style and a way of going step by step that is made for easy following. He is a must on any list. I only wish he lived near and I could attend his talks.

Next is Denise of "FamilyMatters". I have learned much about the nuts and bolts of the tools I use online today. I really miss that she hasn't blogged in a while, but her archives are there and searchable. I would recommend that everyone go and read through them. Very informative.

Of course there is "Dear Myrtle". She is an absolute must read. I have been using her Get Organized lists this year. I appreciate her blog and it's information very much. She keeps me up to date about everything!

Renee of "Renee's Genealogy Blog" is the first genealogy blog I think I ran across. She was at another place back then. Her blog was informative and still is. I keep up with the FamilySearch changes at Renee's.

"Midwestern Microhistory: A Genealogy Blog" is a very long name for a blog. It is deserved. Harold keeps me up on genealogy in my area of the country. Anyone in the midwest should follow his blog!

Jasia over at "Creative Gene" is another that I go to regularly. She often posts her scrapbook pages, though I believe she is all digital. I am still old-fashioned. I am still hard-copy scrapbooking. One day I will switch to the 21st century!

FootnoteMaven and Shades of the Departed are must reads too! fM and I share a deep love of old photos. She is always a good read. I consider her a friend as well. Shades is what I consider a 'learning' blog. I've come to enjoy the columnists and even have favorites I hate to miss!

Becky over at Kinexxions is a fellow Hoosier and very informative as well. She has given me many good ideas. One that comes to mind immediately is using aluminium foil to 'read' an old and faded tombstone! Comes in handy to have someone sharing these wonderful and helpful ideas!

And then there's Jessica and her "Jessica's Genejournal". I enjoy reading this young woman's blog. She always has something interesting and informative to say. She should be very proud of herself. She is a good writer and a good researcher!

I know the list looks like only 9, but fM gets it twice! She's just double the fun!! I do, of course, read many more as time permits. But it would be a very long list and you would give up reading long before you got to the end of the list.

Since I am so late I will not inform each one of the award as one normally would. I will simply put this up and tweet. Probably all have already gotten this award at least once. I know I have seen it already on some of them. I don't want to make them do it all over again. But if you show up, and you are on my list, all I can say is thank you. You have become a part of my life, and I think of all of you often in my research.

Sunday, May 31, 2009

Dad's Calling - The Good Earth


I could start out on this topic going a back a century or more and talking about ancestors that came to this country and farmed. I have a family history of farmers on both sides. But, I don't have to talk about family stories or ancestors I never met. I'll start with a very contemporary memory.

My Dad, Rufus Brock, died in June of 2006. So I will dedicate this post to him.

He was born in Alabama, but moved to Indiana with his family when he was a teen. His father didn't care for the family business, farming. He worked in a factory that was building a plant in Indiana. He agreed to go north. Dad lied about his age and went to work in the new Indiana plant. There he worked until he took early retirement when the plant was being closed in the 70's. He was a line foreman and die setter at Arvin Industries when he retired.

He then embarked upon his second career. He became a general contractor. He enjoyed building things. I have many pieces of furniture he built for me and often pass houses he built around town. He was good at it. But there was only one thing he did all his life. One thing he loved the most. He always had a garden. It was in his blood.


So he retired late from contracting, and began his final career and journey. Dad loved to learn and try new things.


He began his gardening in earnest. He took his vegetables to the farmers markets in the tri-county area. He was always growing unusual vegetables and the flower salads he made were quite popular! He offered fresh cut flowers when he had them.

Somehow he made the newspaper almost every year. He had become a well-known and well-liked regular at the local farmer's market. He went home with an empty truck most of the time. I think he enjoyed meeting the people at the markets most.

He spent his last morning in his beloved garden. That is how he would have wanted it to be.

Written for Carnival of Genealogy: The Good Earth
Due: June 1, 2009

Friday, May 15, 2009

One Lovely Blog Award


Diana R. over at Random Relatives gave me an award! She said, "The instructions are quite simple - just to nominate 7 other blogs." Thank you so much, Diana, for the recognition of TwigTalk. I appreciate it.








Finding Grandpa

A Couple of Bubbles off Center

Gena's Genealogy

Tangled Trees

Two Sides of The Ocean

Kinfold News

Searching For Family Branches

Busy and More Busy!

Seems like I never have time to post anymore. Right now so many things are calling out for my attention. I'm still working with RM4. I like it very much. I can cut down on the mess on WorldConnect, thanks to Mr. RM [Bruce B.], but not make it all look nice. Some still present different and not very neatly. But that is WC's fault. It needs to be upgraded I think. I like RM and will stay with it.
I have gotten 2 cemeteries [photos; one complete and one partial] onto the county site and I'm working on the third. Then I have 4th and 5th. . . . and a huge folder full of snippets, an entire family, and a lot of little things, photos both person and place type yet to go online. I have enough to keep me busy until next year. I will be going to cemeteries again myself to photograph stones. Nice to have a lot to do. For a long time the site was so quiet, no subs coming in at all. Nice pick up!
I've been looking at the FamilySearch Wiki. I wonder if anyone knows about uploading your file onto the new FamilySearch. I had read some time ago that it would be different. That you would be able to work on your tree online at the new FamilySearch and you could fix mistakes as well. I have been waiting for that and have heard nothing. I have been interested in putting mine online there when that is available. Right now I am just trying to find my way around and see everything. Though I did try working with the Wiki. I was putting one of my courthouse photos onto the Jackson County, Indiana page in the United States Wiki. I failed. I uploaded the photo and got a confirmation that it had gotten there but when I tried to put it in the Courthouse part of the page it kept saying there was no such image. I will try again later.
In the middle of all that I just need to make time for blogging! I'll make it somehow. I got an award and have only just remembered. I will get it up later as well....

Sunday, April 26, 2009

Blogoversary. . . Number 1

Well, it would seem that year number 1 is gone already. How time flies. I actually forgot all about it. I have been so busy lately that blogging has taken a back burner. Shame on me. But, I figure you have to go where life leads.
Thinking about when I started blogging brought to mind all that has transpired this year. I've met so many wonderful people. All of you Genea-bloggers! How marvelous you all are! I didn't even know you were out there. It's great to have gotten to know you all. I've learned so much and gotten so much work done as a result. I enjoy the community of like-mindedness. It's been a wonderful year full of results, friendships, lessons and fun. I've made more contacts than ever before. Can't ask for much more than that!
I can only hope that year 2 is just as productive. That I continue to grow in every area of my life. With Facebook and Twitter added to this blog, I find that it is easy to branch out even more, into places I thought I would never be. Explore other areas that I could not go before. So much to do and so little time.
You all have added such wonderful texture to the canvas of my life. Thank you all.

Thursday, April 9, 2009

Still Plodding On . . . . .

I have been updating files. Actually, file. I am still working on my Janes/Jaynes file. I have entered hundreds of sources, numerous individuals, photos and documents. I still have to finish up adding the census cites then I will be done, completely up to date with my Janes/Jaynes family. Sounds good. But . . . . :o) . . . . I have 3 more to update after this one. It is going to take a while.
NEW PROMISE TO SELF:
I will enter sources, individuals and documents as I go. I will not say, "I'll do it later", not once! This will not happen again.
I hope I'm listening. I am sniffling, sneezing and headachy which requires meds. But, of course that is NO excuse. I'll be very mad at myself if I come to this point again in a couple of years.
I can't believe how it piles up so fast. Anyway, I pulled all my files of the people in the file and have gone through the notes again. Some little treasures there. They didn't fit the last time I went through them, they do now. That is always fun. Besides it is very nice to see how far along I have come on some of the lines in the file. While still at a standstill on others. In particular my David Janes in Kentucky. I think in the end I will have to go through all the Janes in the area and find where they belong. Perhaps then I can see another avenue in this family. Though I am still pretty certain that he is the son of David from the "History of the Janes-Peek Family by Dr. Collins. If that is the only Janes family/line in the area, I will be even more certain. I can't find his death. I know they came north to Indiana to Washington County after 1860, as he is in the Washington County census in 1870. But other researchers have him in Kentucky after that, so it is still up in the air. So the hunt will continue when I have the time.......
I am doing all of this in the RootsMagic 4. I am VERY happy with this program! I cannot even say how happy. Sources are a breeze. It's nice to NOT have questions about how to cite a particular source. I've run into just about every kind citable (if that is a word) and no questions. I wasn't sure about 3, but I am pleased with 4. I've gotten quite familiar with the program now too.

Sunday, April 5, 2009

Techno Gen, My World - Blogging Prompt #14

I'll start off saying that over the past 3 days I have gotten so much work done! The only way to get used to a new program is to use it, use it, use it! So I did! I have added, to be exact now, 133 individuals (44 families), and 202 source/citations. I was using/learning the new RootsMagic4. I have to say I am really pleased. I wasn't sure about version 3 but this new one is excellent. The source/citing in particular. I could not have gotten so much done otherwise. I did not have to go to help at all. It is a really friendly program.
All of this is in only one of my files. the Janes/Jaynes file. I have my main file broken into 4, plus I have the kids and in-law files. (It's just easier for me to work on broken up.) So my first technology is the new RootsMagic4. (Bravo and thanks Bruce B.!!)
I'm actually rather low-tech. I use Windows Notepad a lot. I also use Treepad, the free version. Though during the past few days I have added notes to RM4's "To Do" under the person I need to do about. RM4 allows me to print them out so why have a dozen things up and running.
I never take in gedcoms from people or from online. I will go over them and by hand, extract things I need. I use MudCreeks GenViewer to open and look at gedcoms. I bought it several years ago and it continues to be fine, even when I made the change to Vista from XP. I worked on genealogy for many years before I got on the internet. So, I still tend to want to work on paper first, though I am getting very 21st century in the past couple of years! I may toss out those pencils yet!
Irfanview . This is the most important word people can learn! LOL! This little viewer has become THE most important image tool I have. It will batch resize! What a wonder! It will also open .gif format, which Windows no longer supports in Vista). I have PaintShopPro8 for doing any touch-ups, etc. to my images. I am happy with version 8 and have not updated. I also have GIMP, but I am not as comfortable with it.
Since blogging I have had so much help and a lot of contacts. I think blogs are the greatest thing since sliced bread for genealogy nowadays! Besides it's fun and you get to talk genealogy! Most people just want me to shut up. Now I can talk and talk.... (just click the little x on your tab above :o) Then there is Facebook, Twitter and all the other online goodies to help with the contact/aid and conversation part of the addiction...sorry, hobby. Let's see, I can Tweet and comment on FB at the same time, I can send a note, post, etc. from Diigo (Diigo is wonderful) to FB or Twitter. This is only the beginning........
NOW I have to learn "Cloud Computing"!
I really am a minimalist. The less stuff the more work as far as I am concerned.

This is my first time at Blogging Prompt. Nice!

Tuesday, March 31, 2009

Tombstone Tuesday - The Beards

This is the stone of my great-grandfather, Charles "Pink" Beard and his second wife, Myrtle in Noble Hill Cemetery in Etowah County, Alabama. It's a rather large stone. The photo was taken by my cousin, Tina Brock Smith.

Monday, March 30, 2009

My Janes/Jaynes Line

I have a problem with my Janes/Jaynes line. I ran into a wall in Metcalf County, Kentucky. I have several walls, but this one is a big one. It all starts with my grandfather, James Jaynes. He never talked much about his family, but what he did say helped get me this far. It was easy to trace to Kentucky. Census records went right back. Very clear. It becomes muddy though, really fast.

Let's see, there is my grandfather, James, his father George Thomas, his father, William Obadier, and finally his father, David. David is the problem. He was born about 1811 in Kentucky and married Nancy [most likely Hughart/Huggart/Hugard] about 1829. In the 1850 census of Barren County, Kentucky. These children are listed: Rebecca Hughart Janes, Henry B. Janes, Martha W. Janes, Grace W. Janes, Elizabeth Janes, James T. Janes, Nancy M.C. Janes, Eliza J. Janes. William O. shows up in the 1860 Metcalf County, Kentucky census with siblings Nancy and Eliza, and his parents, David and Nancy. Before 1850 I cannot even know which David Janes is in the census, though there are some in the area. It's just impossible to tell.

There is a David Janes Jr. in the area. His history was laid out in the book, "History of the Janes-Peek Family (From Grandma's Little Trunk)," 1975 by Dr. Reba Neighbors Collins. She has David Sr. with only 3 children; Thomas J JANES (b: 1806 in Adair,KY), Mary JANES (b: 1820 in KY) and possibly Spencer C JANES (b: 1804 in ,,IL/TN). Only 3 children don't seem quite right. He was a Junior, his father was David Sr., so what happened. I read that Mrs. Collins thought David Jr. had more children but could not find them. So. . . . It's an easy jump from there to where I think it will go. One more fact, David Jr. was married first to Rebecca MNU. Another tidbit.

Now for the hunt.....

Sunday, March 29, 2009

Meet Irene Raborn Brock


Irene is my great-great-grandmother. This is really sad. I don't have the sources in the program for this family. I will get to work immediately!

Ancestors of Irene Matilda RABURN
Generation No. 1

Irene Matilda RABURN, born 11 Aug 1868 in Monroe County, Tennessee; died 16 Feb 1918 in Polk County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of John RABORN. She married Francis Marion BROCK 26 Jan 1882 in McMinn County, Tennessee. He was born 25 Dec 1861 in McMinn County, Tennessee, and died 22 Dec 1936 in Bradley County, Tennessee. He was the son of Andrew Jackson BROCK and Emeline JACK.

Generation No. 2

John RABORN

Child of John RABORN is:
  1. Irene Matilda RABURN

Saturday, March 28, 2009

Meet Loraney Willcutt Jaynes


This is my great-grandmother. Everyone called her 'Raney'. She is listed as Luraney in all the records but my grandmother named a daughter for her as Lorraine. So I am not sure of the spelling of her first name. I have it here as it appears in records.

Ancestors of Luraney Willcut

Generation No. 1

Luraney Willcut[1], born 26 May 1853 in South Carolina; died 04 Dec 1947 in New Castle, Henry County, Indiana[2]. She was the daughter of David Willcut and Charity Robins. She married William Obadier Janes[3,4] 19 Apr 1869 in Washington County, Indiana[5]. He was born 09 Sep 1851 in Munfordsville, Kentucky, and died 07 Feb 1936 in Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana[6]. He was the son of David Janes and Nancy H. Hughart.
Generation No. 2

David Willcut[7], born 1815 in Kentucky. He married Charity Robins 24 Feb 1836 in Washington County, Indiana.
Charity Robins, born 1818 in North Carolina; died Bef. 1864 in Washington County, Indiana. She was the daughter of Daniel Robins and Massah Swaim.

Children of David Willcut and Charity Robins are:
  1. Luraney Willcut
  2. Sarah Jane Willcut
  3. Judith Willcut
  4. Susannah Elizabeth Willcut
  5. Mary A. Willcut
  6. Phoebe Willcut
  7. George H. Willcut
  8. Amanda Willcut
  9. Joseph R. Willcut

Endnotes 1. Obituary/Brownstown Banner, Dec 4, 1947JAYNES-Mrs. Lourany Jaynes, 93, died at her home at New Castle Thursday noon, following a year's illness.She was a former Seymour resident and moved to New Castle about ten years ago.She was a native of Salem and was born near Salem, May 26, 1854. She was the widow of William Jaynes, who died February 7, 1931. Funeral services were conducted at the Voss Mortuary, Seymour, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of the service the Rev. Walter Moseley of Uniontown. Burial in the Conologue Cemetery.She is survived by ten children: (George Thomas) Tom, of Jackson County; Joseph, Aaron and Claude, all of Seymour; Arthur, Charles and DeWitt Jaynes all of Indianapolis; Mrs. Lonia Loftis and Mrs. Pearl Mosier, New Castle; 48 grandchildren; 105 great-granchildren and 17 great-great-grandchildren.. 2. Obituary, BROWNSTOWN BANNER, JAYNES--Mrs. Lourany Jaynes, 93, died at her home at New Castle Thursday noon, following a year's illness. She was a former Seymour resident and moved to New Castle about ten years ago.She was a native of Salem and was born near Salem, May 26, 1854. She was the widow of William Jaynes, who died February 7, 1931.Funeral services were conducted at the Voss Mortuary, Seymour, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of the Rev. Walter Moseley of Uniontown. Burial in the Conologue Cemetery.She is survived by ten children: (George Thomas) Tom, of Jackson county; Joseph, Aaron and Claude, all of Seymour; Arthur, Charles and DeWitt Jaynes all of Indianapolis; Mrs. Loney Loftis and Mrs. Pearl Mosier, New Castle; 48 grandchildren; 105 great-grandchildren and 17 great-great-grandchildren. 3. Obituary/Brownstown Banner. 4. Obituary/Seymour Tribune,Seymour,IN, Seymour Daily Tribune - February 9, 1931Funeral Services for Wm.O.Jaynes-Rites Conducted from home this afternoon-Deceased was well known-Funeral services for Wm.O.Jaynes, age 79, who died at his home, 420 Circle St., at 8:30 Saturday evening after an illness of 3 weeks, were held at 2:00 this afternoon from the home in charge of the Rev. Homer Smith. Burial was in the Conologue cemetery.Mr. Jaynes was born 9/9/1851, at munfordsville, KY, the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Jaynes. He was married in 1869 in Washinton County to Miss Lurinda Willcott, who survives. He moved to this county 35 years ago. He was well known and highly respected here. Besides the widow, he is survived my 10 children, Thomas, Claude, Aaron and Joseph, all of this city: Luther, of Connersville; DeWitt, Arthur and Charles, of Indianapolis; and Mrs. Theodore Mosier and Mrs. louise Loftus, both of NewCastle. He is also survived by 75 grandchildren and 41 great grandchildren.. 5. Index to "Marriage Record" 1850 - 1920, Washington County, IndianaBook: H Original Source Page: 163 Marriage Date: 19 Apr 1869. 6. Obituary, 2//9/1931 Seymour Daily Tribune-Brownstown Banner, OBITUARY--2//9/1931 Seymour Daily Tribune--Funeral Services for Wm.O.Jaynes--Rites Conducted From Home This Afternoon--Deceased Was Well Known --Funeral services for Wm. O. Jaynes,age 79, who died at his home, 420 Circle St., at 8:30 Saturday evening after an illness of 3 weeks, were held at 2:00 this afternoon from the home in charge of the Rev. Homer Smith. Burial was in the Conologue cemetery. Mr. Jaynes was born 9/9/1851, at Munfordsvile, KY, the son of Mr. & Mrs. David Jaynes. He was married in 1869 in Washington County to Miss Lurinda Willcott, who survives. He moved to this county 35 years ago.He was well known & highly respected here. Besides the widow, he is survived by 10 children, Thomas, Claude, Aaron & Joseph, all of this city: Luther, of Connersville; DeWitt, Arthur & Charles, of Indianapolis; and Mrs. Theodore Mosier & Mrs. Louisa Loftus, both of Newcastle. He is also survived by 75 grand-children and 41 great grandchildren.Brownstown BannerJackson Co., INFeb. 11, 1931JAYNES-- Following a three weeks illness, William O. Jaynes passed away at his home in Seymour Saturday night, aged 79 years.Funeral services in charge of the Rev. Homer Smith, were held at the home Monday afternoon. Burial in the Conologue cemetery. Mr. Jaynes was born at Munfordville, Kentucky, September 9, 1851. In 1869 he was married in Washington County to Miss Lurinda Willcott, who survives him.He moved to Jackson County about thirty-five years ago.Besides his widow he leaves the following children, Thomas, Joseph, Aaron, Claude, all of Seymour; Luther, of Connersville; Arthur, DeWitt and Charles of Indianapolis: Mrs. Theodore Mosier and Mrs. Louis Loftus, of New Castle; seventy-five grandchildren and forty-one great-grandchildren. 7. 1870 Census Jackson County, Indiana. 8. 1870 census, INDIANA , WASHINGTON, GIBSON TWPSeries: M593 Roll: 369 Page: 239. 9. Marriage, Book: F Original Source Page: 437 . 10. Marriage Record Jackson County 1850-1920 Inclusive Vol II Letters O-Z, Marriage Book/Jackson Co, IN, Original Source Page: 505 , Book: H Original Source Page: 505 . 11. 1870 census, INDIANA , WASHINGTON, GIBSON TWPSeries: M593 Roll: 369 Page: 239. 12. Marriage, Book: G Original Source Page: 273 . 13. Marriage, Book: H Original Source Page: 625 .

Friday, March 27, 2009

Meet Maggie Hovis Martin


Maggie was my great-grandmother, and my Grandma Jaynes favorite grandmother!

Ancestors of Margaret C Hovis


Generation No. 1

Margaret C Hovis[1], born 1867 in Ohio; died 10 Feb 1940 in Paris Crossing, Jennings County, in[2]. She was the daughter of Henry W. Hovis and Elizabeth E. Bohall. She married Samuel S. Martin[3,4,5] 1883. He was born 14 Feb 1860 in Jackson County, Indiana, and died 18 Jan 1944 in Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana[6]. He was the son of John Stanley Martin and Mary Ann Allman.

Generation No. 2

Henry W. Hovis[7,8,9,10], born 01 Jul 1840 in Noble County, Ohio; died 11 Jun 1935 in Nashville, Brown County, Indiana. He was the son of Henry Hovis and Sarah Hogg. He married Elizabeth E. Bohall 09 Jul 1864 in Brown County, Indiana[11].
Elizabeth E. Bohall[12,13], born 17 Jun 1844 in Jackson County, Indiana; died 17 Jul 1897 in Jackson County, Indiana. She was the daughter of George David Bohall and Catherine E. Draper.
Children of Henry Hovis and Elizabeth Bohall are:

  1. Seth Hovis
  2. Mary C. Hovis
  3. Margaret C Hovis
  4. Martha Jane Hovis

Endnotes 1. 1900 US Census, Series: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1, MARTIN, SAMUEL S (1900 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, BROWNSTOWN TWPAge: 40, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1. 2. Burkholder Funeral Records, Jackosn Counth INGenWeb Arhchive, http://files.usgwarchives.org/in/jackson/cemetery/burk_4.txtMartin, Maggie 511 Age 73y10m 5d d. Feb. 10 1940 Parents Henry Hovis and Elizabeth BohallBurial Riverview. 3. 1870 US Census, Series: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 277, SS Martin with Cocherham and Allman (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANASeries: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 277. 4. 1900 US Census, Series: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1, MARTIN, SAMUEL S (1900 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, BROWNSTOWN TWPAge: 40, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1. 5. 1910 US Census, Series: T624 Roll: 359 Page: 150, MARTIN, SAMUEL S (1910 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JENNINGS, SPENCER TWPAge: 50, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T624 Roll: 359 Page: 150. 6. Burkholder Funeral Records, Jackson County INGenWeb Archive, http://files.usgwarchives.org/in/jackson/cemetery/burk_4.txtMartin, Samuel S. 733 Age 83y 11m4d d. Jan. 18 1944 Mother's maiden name Polly Ann Allman. 7. 1870 Census, M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362, HOVIS, HENRY (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, GRASSY FORK TWPAge: 28, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362. 8. 1880 Census, T9 Roll: 286 Page: 207, HOVIS, HENRY (1880 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, SALT CRKAge: 38, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: T9 Roll: 286 Page: 207. 9. 1910 Census, T624 Roll: 364 Page: 188, HOVIS, HENRY (1910 U.S. Census)INDIANA , LAWRENCE, PLEASANT RUN TWPAge: 68, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: T624 Roll: 364 Page: 188. 10. 1886: History of Jackson County, Indiana. Brant and Fuller, Page 424, MARTIN GROVE CHURCH. This church was organized March 15, 1878, three milesnortheast of Clear Spring. Members: Prudy Elkins, SarahMartin, Martha Scott, Hanna Scott, Nancy Cobb, Ollie Winein-ger, W. A. Williams, Sarah Williams, Mary B. Smith, John C.Bowman, Adaline Bowman, Martin Beavers, Mary A. Beavers,Henry Hovis, Elizabeth Hovis and William Paris; ministers:Elders R. J. Gorbet, David Sexton, J. R. McCoy, J. W. Maynardand H. Hovis.http://www.jacksoncountyhistory.org/books/index.asp?book=brantfuller&page=424. 11. Marriage Records 1853-1901, Book 3/Original Source Page 187, QUAY 3 County BrownName Elizabeth E BohallSpouse Henry W HovisMarriage Date 09 Jul 1864. 12. 1870 Census, M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362, HOVIS, ELIZABETH (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, GRASSY FORK TWPAge: 28, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362. 13. 1880 Census, T9 Roll: 286 Page: 207, HOVIS, ELIZABETH (1880 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, SALT CRKAge: 38, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: T9 Roll: 286 Page: 207. 14. 1870 Census, M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362, HOVIS, SETH (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, GRASSY FORK TWPAge: 28, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362. 15. 1880 Census, Series: T9 Roll: 286 Page: 208, HOVIS, HENRY (1880 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, SALT CRKAge: 38, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: T9 Roll: 286 Page: 208. 16. 1870 Census, M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362, HOVIS, MARY (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, GRASSY FORK TWPAge: 28, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362. 17. 1880 Census, T9 Roll: 286 Page: 208, HOVIS, MARY (1880 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, SALT CRKAge: 38, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: T9 Roll: 286 Page: 208. 18. 1870 Census, M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362, HOVIS, HENRY (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, GRASSY FORK TWPAge: 28, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 362. 19. 1880 Census, T9 Roll: 286 Page: 208, HOVIS, MARTHA (1880 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, SALT CRKAge: 38, Race: WHITE, Born: OHSeries: T9 Roll: 286 Page: 208.

Thursday, March 26, 2009

Meet Cora Hines Jaynes


Cora was my great-grandmother. She died before I was born so I didn't know her. My grandparents lived with her and Tom when they were first married. She was a very loving and warm person. She was well-known for her firey temper.

Ancestors of Cora Hines


Generation No. 1

Cora Hines[1,2], born 08 Mar 1870 in Neoga, Cumberland County, Illinois; died 21 Dec 1948 in Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana[3]. She was the daughter of George Hines and Agnes Joice/Joyce. She married first an Unk Abbott. She married George Thomas Jaynes[4] 11 Sep 1896 in Jackson County, Indiana[5]. He was born 15 Oct 1869 in Washington County, Indiana, and died 15 Mar 1954 in Seymour, Jackson County, Indiana. He was the son of William Obadier Janes and Luraney Willcut.

Generation No. 2

George Hines6, born Jul 1833 in IN; died 1909 in Neoga, Cumberland County, Illinois. He was the son of Cadwell Hines and Susan Angleton. He married Agnes Joice/Joyce 17 Oct 1852 in Switerland County, IN.
Agnes Joice/Joyce[7], born 1832 in Rockingham County, NC; died 1872 in Neoga, Cumberland County, Illinois. She was the daughter of George Washington Joice/Joyce and Jane Iden.


Children of George Hines and Agnes Joice/Joyce are:
  1. Cora Hines
  2. Susan F. Hines
  3. George P. Hines
  4. Nancy Ellen Hines
  5. Louisa Hines
  6. Mary Jane Hines
Endnotes 1. Obituary/Seymour Tribune,Seymour,IN, December 21, 1948 (DOD) Mrs. Cora JaynesMrs. Cora Jaynes, 78, died at her home in Seymour Tuesday night at 7:45 o'clock following a six weeks illness.Funeral services will be held at the Voss Mortuary Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock.Mrs Jaynes was born in Jackson County March 8, 1870, the daughter of George and Agnes Joyce Hines. She was married in Brownstown, September 11, 1898 to George T. Jaynes, who survives.Besides the husband she is survived by six children, Harry and Jimmy, and Mrs. Agnes Henley and Mrs. Helen Anderson, all of Seymour; Mrs Mary Trapp, Seymour, RR1; Mrs. Myrtle Ballard, Indianapolis; 26 grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and on sister, Mrs. Jane McKinney, Neoga, Illinois.. 2. Obituary/Brownstown Banner, Brownstown BannerFuneral services for Mrs. Cora Jaynes, 78, a life-long resident of Jackson County, will be conducted at 2 o'clock Friday afternoon from the Voss Mortuary, with the Elder John H Engleking, pastor of the Glenlawn Pentecostal Assembly, in charge. Burial in Chestnut Ridge Cemetery. Mrs. Jaynes died Tuesday night at the home, 309 Hancock Street. Friends may call at the Voss Mortuary.. 3. Obituary, Brownstown Banner. 4. Obituary/Seymour Tribune,Seymour,IN, Seymour Daily Tribune - ObituaryGeorge Jaynes, Aged Seymour Man Succumbs-Rites Held Today Funeral rites were held this afternoon from the Voss Mortuary in Seymour, in charge Rev. Elmore Smith, for George Thomas Jaynes, 81 year old Seymour resident, who died Monday at his home in that city. He had been ill only three days.Burial was in the Chestnut Ridge Cemetery.A native of Washington County, the son of the late William O. and Lorraine Wilcutt Jaynes. The deceased was born October 15, 1869. He was married in Brownstown in 1898 to Cora Hinds, who died in 1948. Mr. Jaynes was employed as a fireman for the Ebner Ice and Cold Storage Company in Seymour for many years.Six children survive. They are Harry Jaynes, James Jaynes, Mrs Agnes Henley, Mrs. Helen Anderson and Mrs Mary Trapp, all residents of Seymour, and Mrs. Myrtle Ballard of Indianapolis.Also surviving are six brother, Joseph Jaynes, Aaron Jaynes and Claude Jaynes of Seymour; Arthur Jaynes of Indianapolis, Luther Jaynes of Connersville and DeWitt Jaynes of Indianapolis; one sister, Mrs Lona Loftis of New Castle; nine grandchildren and twenty great-grandchildren.. 5. Marriage Record Jackson County 1850-1920 Inclusive Vol II Letters O-Z, Marriage Book/Jackson Co, IN. 6. 1880 census, Series: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550, HINES, GEORGE (1880 U.S. Census)ILLINOIS , CUMBERLAND, NEOGAAge: 47, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550. 7. 1880 census, Series: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550, ILLINOIS , CUMBERLAND, NEOGASeries: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550. 8. Obituary, Neoga, IL Newspaper, 1949.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Meet Nancy Bearden Beard

This is my great-great-grandmother. I don't have a photo of her. My grandmother, Bizzie, loved her and lived with her for a while during her younger years.

Ancestors of Nancy Elizabeth Bearden


Generation No. 1

Nancy Elizabeth Bearden[1], born 28 Mar 1866 in Etowah County, Alabama; died 28 Sep 1944 in Attalla, Etowah County, Alabama[2]. She was the daughter of Roland Bearden and Lucinda White. She married Charley Beard[3] 16 Apr 1884 in Dekalb County, Alabama[4]. He was born Mar 1866 in Georgia, and died 28 Jun 1902 in Turkeytown, Etowah County, Alabama.

Generation No. 2

Roland Bearden[5], born 1820 in St. Clair County, Alabama; died in . He was the son of James Bearden and Mary Unk. He married Lucinda White 26 May 1841.
Lucinda White[5], born 1828; died in .


Children of Roland Bearden and Lucinda White are:
  1. William M. Bearden
  2. Orval J. Bearden
  3. Lucinda A. Bearden
  4. Mary J. Bearden
  5. Matilda C. Bearden
  6. James M. Bearden
  7. Margaret L. Bearden
  8. Adeline Bearden
  9. John C. Bearden
  10. Frances D. Bearden
  11. Nancy Elizabeth Bearden
  12. Josephine Bearden
  13. Franklin P. Bearden
  14. Fannie E Bearden
Endnotes

1. 1910 Census, 2-B, Cox Beat, Etowah County, AL.
2. Death Certificate, State File #19204, Attalla, Alabama.
3. 1900 Census, 1900 Alabama, Etowah, Hollis, District 155 Barde, C. H. March 1850 age 50 AL AL ALNannie wife March 1866 age 34 married 16 years, has had 7 children, 7 living AL AL ALSallie daughter Apr 1886 age 14 born ALChutly (? no doubt Charly), son, Oct 1888 age 11 ALFrank, son, Jan 1890 age 10, ALMay, daughter, July 1891, age 8, ALMagey, daughter, Feb 1894, age 6, ALJohn, son, May 1896, age 4, ALJoe, son, Sep 1899, age 9 months, AL.
4. Marriage Index: Indiana, 1851-1900, OSPage: 401, QUAY 3.
5. 1870 US Census.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Meet 'Addie' Morgan Brock

This is my great-grandmother. I knew her growing up. She was a tiny little woman always busy. The food was to die for!! Meet "Addie", my Granny Brock!

Ancestors of Jessie Adeline MORGAN

Generation No. 1

Jessie Adeline MORGAN, born 22 Dec 1884 in Monroe, TN; died 23 Jan 1966 in Boaz, Marshall County, Alabama[1]. She was the daughter of Reese Simpson MORGAN and Matilda Marie WHITE. She married Patrick Henry BROCK 05 Feb 1906 in Marshall County, Alabama. He was born 20 Jun 1884 in McMinn Co., TN, and died 24 Feb 1972 in Marshall, Alabama[2]. He was the son of Francis Marion BROCK and Irene Matilda RABURN.


Generation No. 2

Reese Simpson MORGAN, born 25 Dec 1856 in Monroe County, Tennessee; died 10 Jan 1942 in Collinsville, Alabama. He was the son of William M. MORGAN and Sarah Serena TALLENT. He married Matilda Marie WHITE.
Matilda Marie WHITE, born Oct 1854 in TN; died 1925 in Lloyd's Chapel Baptist Church Calhoun County, Alabama. She was the daughter of Tolliver White.


Children of Reese MORGAN and Matilda WHITE are:

  1. Rufus M MORGAN
  2. Minnie Ellen MORGAN
  3. James Frank MORGAN
  4. Jessie Adeline MORGAN
  5. Robert Benjamin MORGAN
  6. Kitty O. MORGAN
  7. Callie Miranda MORGAN
  8. Grace B. MORGAN
  9. Edgar L. MORGAN
  10. Talmidge Digger MORGAN

Endnotes 1. Funeral Tract/AL. 2. Obituary, Boaz, AL - Carr Funeral Home, Carr Funeral HomeBoazBROCK, Pat H., 87, Rt. 1, Boaz, died last night in a Boaz Nursing Home after an extended illness. Funeral services will be held tomorrow at 11 a.m. at Bethlehem Baptist Church with burial in Copeland's Bridge Cemetery. Survivors, daughter, Mrs. Irene Smith, Boaz; sons, Rufus Brock, Indiana; Leonard Brock, Boaz; Warner and Paul Brock, both of Arab; Calvin Brock, Houston, Texas; 27 grandchildren; 50 great-grandchildren; sisters, Mrs. Jennie Green, Tenn.; brothers, Dewey Brock, Clevelandf, Tenn.; Lawrence Brock, Lake City, Tenn.; Cleveland and Walter Brock, both of Jasper, Tenn.; Andy Brock, Asheville, NC. A native of Tennessee, Mr. Brock was a retired farmer and a Baptist. 3. Obituary, Attalla, Alabama, OBITUARY -- The Gadsden Times, Saturday, September 17, 1949Funeral Services For Attalla WomanMrs. Lummie Morgan, 62, Lester Street, Attalla, died this morning at her residence after an illness of two months.Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. at Copeland's Bridge Baptist Church with the Rev. Grady Humphries officiating.She was a member of the Church of God, and had been a resident of Etowah County for the past 18 years.She is survived by her husband, J. F. Morgan, Attalla, two sons, Horace Morgan, Attalla, and Alvin Morgan, Centre;one daughter, Mrs. Hobert Chandler, Centre; one sister, Mrs. Lee Wilson, Madisonville, Tenn., and seven grandchildren.Active pallbearers will be Willie Garner, Boby Crumpton, Charlie Matthews, Louie Hathcock, John Leath andBill Chandler.Burial will be in the Copeland's Bridge Cemetery with Collier-Butler Funeral Home directing.- sent to me by Alice Phillips.

Monday, March 23, 2009

Another Visit With Bizzie Beard Brock


This is going to be another visit with my grandmother, 'Grandma Brock', Bizzie Lee [Beard]. I posted a couple of times about her. So in honor of Women's History Month, I will pull them up for you to learn about her again. She was a strong, southern woman and a very good role model for me growing up. I miss her.

Bizzie Lee [Beard] Brock

Bizzie's Quilts

Sunday, March 22, 2009

Meet Agnes Joyce/Joice Hines

I don't have a photo of Agnes. I wish I did. I love to see the faces of my ancestors.
Here is Agnes my great-great-grandmother.

Ancestors of Agnes Joice/Joyce


Generation No. 1

1. Agnes Joice/Joyce[1], born 1832 in Rockingham County, NC; died 1872 in Neoga, Cumberland Co., Illinois. She was the daughter of George Washington Joice/Joyce and Jane Iden. She married George Hines[2] 17 Oct 1852 in Switerland County, Indiana. He was born Jul 1833 in Indiana, and died 1909 in Neoga, Cumberland County, Illinois. He was the son of Cadwell Hines and Susan Angleton.

Generation No. 2

George Washington Joice/Joyce, born 1805 in North Carolina; died Bef. 1870 in Switzerland County, Indiana. He married 3. Jane Iden 22 Dec 1825 in Loudoun County, Virginia.
Jane Iden, born 1806 in NC; died in Switzerland County, Indiana.

Children of George Joice/Joyce and Jane Iden are:
  1. Agnes Joice/Joyce
  2. Robert Joice/Joyce
  3. George W. Joice/Joyce
  4. Peter W. Joice/Joyce
  5. Effa Joice/Joyce
  6. Hester Joice/Joyce
  7. Elijah Joice/Joyce
  8. Martha Joice/Joyce
  9. Thomas Joice/Joyce
Endnotes

1. 1880 census, Series: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550, ILLINOIS , CUMBERLAND, NEOGASeries: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550.
2. 1880 census, Series: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550, HINES, GEORGE (1880 U.S. Census)ILLINOIS , CUMBERLAND, NEOGAAge: 47, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T9 Roll: 184 Page: 550.
3. 1880 census, Series: T9 Roll: 313 Page: 32, JOYCE, ROBERT (1880 U.S. Census)INDIANA , SWITZERLAND, CRAIGAge: 50, Race: WHITE, Born: NCSeries: T9 Roll: 313 Page: 32.
4. Marriage Index: Indiana, 1851-1900, County Court Records County Court Records Film reference number: 1310439 - 1310443.
5. Marriage Index: Indiana, 1851-1900, County Court Records Film reference number: 1310439 - 1310443.
6. 1870 census, Series: M593 Roll: 361 Page: 268, JOICE, THOMAS (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANA , SWITZERLAND, CRAIG TWPAge: 20, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: M593 Roll: 361 Page: 268.
7. Marriage Index: Indiana, 1851-1900, County Court Records Film reference number: 1310439 - 1310443.

Saturday, March 21, 2009

Meet Myrtle Fanchier Beard

Myrtle was my grandmother, Bizzie Beard's step-mother. She thought of Myrtle as her own mother. Her birth mother died when she was just a baby, so she knew no one else in the role.

Ancestors of Ada Myrtle Fanchier


Generation No. 1

Ada Myrtle Fanchier, born 24 Oct 1888 in Alabama; died 11 Mar 1972 in Alabama. She was the daughter of John F. Fanchier and Georgia Oliver. She married first, . He died Bef. 1911. She married Charles Pinkney Beard[1,2,3] Abt. 1911 in Alabama. He was born 01 Oct 1887 in Georgia or Alabama, and died 19 Aug 1934 in Alabama[4,5]. He was the son of Charley Beard and Nancy Elizabeth Bearden.

Generation No. 2

John F. Fanchier, died in Alabama. He married Georgia Oliver 23 Feb 1879 in Etowah Co. AL.
Georgia Oliver, died in Alabama.


Child of John Fanchier and Georgia Oliver is:
Ada Myrtle Fanchier


Endnotes 1. 1930 Census, Sheet No. 7-B + 8-A, Cox District, Etowah County, AL. 2. 1920 Census, Sheet 17-A, Cox Beat, Etowah County, AL. 3. 1910 Census, 2-B, Cox Beat, Etowah County, AL. 4. Brock Bible, Pinkney Beard died Aug 19, 1934, age 47. 5. Death Certificate, File # 17514, Attalla, Etowah County, AL.

Friday, March 20, 2009

Another Visit With Della Alexander Jaynes

I have been posting profiles and small trees of my female ancestors in honor of Woman's History Month.

My grandmother, 'Grandma Jaynes', has been my subject for numerous posts here. She was my first carnival post. So I will only link to the past postings and let you get to know her again.

Favorite Photo - My First Carnival

TwigTale: Della Mae Alexander/Jaynes

This is a post about her greatest sorrow. The loss of her only son.

Donald Eugene Jaynes: A TwigTale

Thursday, March 19, 2009

Meet Olive Martin Alexander and Her Family


Olive was my great-grandmother. I knew her well. She was not a terribly friendly woman but she had lost her husband young and had 7 children to raise. She worked her way up at the local shoe factory to a supervisor position. She managed to take care of herself and her children very well. She married a second time, briefly.

Ancestors of Olive Ellen Martin


Generation No. 1

Olive Ellen Martin[1], born 25 Dec 1885 in Jackson County, Indiana; died 21 Jan 1975 in Seymour, Indiana. She was the daughter of Samuel S. Martin and Margaret C Hovis. She married William Hays Alexander[2,3,4]. He was born 11 May 1880 in County, Indiana, and died 10 Oct 1928 in Seymour, Indiana[5]. He was the son of John Alexander and Margaret Amanda Atkins.
*she also married Fred Robertson. He went into a sanitorium with TB and they divorced. She had her (married) name Alexander returned. That was what she wanted on her tombstone.

Generation No. 2

2. Samuel S. Martin[6,7,8], born 14 Feb 1860 in Jackson Co., in; died 18 Jan 1944 in Seymour, Jackson County, in9. He was the son of John Stanley Martin and Mary Ann Allman. He married Margaret C Hovis 1883.
3. Margaret C Hovis[10], born 1867 in Ohio; died 10 Feb 1940 in Paris Crossing, Jennings County, Indiana[11]. She was the daughter of Henry W. Hovis and Elizabeth E. Bohall.

Children of Samuel Martin and Margaret Hovis are:

John A. Martin
Olive Ellen Martin
Roxie Mae Martin[12,13,14]
Stanley Martin[16]
Samuel S. Jr. Martin


Endnotes
1. Obituary, Seymour Tribune, Janurary 22, 1975, Seymour TribuneJanurary 22, 1975Mrs. Alexander Dies, Tires Set Thursday Mrs. Olive L. Alexander, 89, of the Jackson Park Convalescent Center, died at 2:45 p.m. Tuesday at the Center after an illness of 11 years. Funeral services will be conducted at 10:30 a.m. Thursday from the Voss Chapel with the Rev. W. Robert Lewis, pastor of Central Christian Church officiating. Burial in Riverview Cemetery. Friends may call at the Voss Mortuary after 4 pm. today. A lifelong local resident, she was a member of Central Christian Church and was retied from the Schawe-Gerwin Shoe Company. Born Dec. 25, 1885, in Jackson County, she was the daughter of the late Samuel and Margaret Martin. On Dec. 28, 1902, in Seymour, she married William H. Alexander, who died Oct. 8, 1928. Surviving are three children. Mrs. James (Della) Jaynes , of Seymour, Mrs. Eugene (Norma) Wright, of Crothersville, and Mrs. Arthur (Lucille) Gerth, of Seymour; one brother, S.M. Martin, Sr,. of Edwardsport; 17 grandchildren, 23 great-grandchildren and nine great-great-grandchildren.She was preceded in death by two sons, tow daughters, two brothers and two sisters. 2. 1920 Census Jackson County, Indiana, William 38, Ollie 34, Della M. 15, Gladdes 13, Merrel 10, Lucile 6, Opel 3, William 6/12. 3. 1910 Census Jackson County, Indiana, William Alexander 30, Ollie E 25, Della M. 5, Gladys 3, Meril H 3/12. 4. Obituary, Seymour Tribune, October 10, 1928, Seymour TribuneOctober 10, 1928William Alexander Dies Early MondayHad Been Ill for Past Six MonthsSuffering of Brights DiseaseRITES 2 P.M. WEDNESDAY William Alexander, age 48, of Glenlawn, died at 3 oclock this morning at his home, 704 Euclid avenue, following an illness of six months. Death was caused by Brights disease. Mr. Alexander was born in Jackson county May 11, 1880, and had lived in the county all his life. He was married in 1902 to Miss Ollie Martin, of near Brownstown. He was affiliated with the Seymour order of Redmen and Haymakers. The former will be in charge of the funeral services which will be held at the First Baptist church at 2 oclock Wednesday afternoon, with the Rev. A.. Cohn officiating. Burial will be in Riverview cemetery. The body is in state at the Tower funeral parlors where friends may call between 6 and 9 oclock this evening. Besides the widow, Mr. Alexander is survived by seven children, Mrs. Della Jaynes, of Seymour; Mrs. Gladys Mails, of Indianapolis; Merill, Lucille, Opal, William Jr., and Norma, all living at home; and a sister, Mrs. Anna Fish, of Norman Station. 5. Obituary, Seymour Tribune, Seymour Tribune - October 10, 1928, Seymour TribuneOctober 10, 1928William Alexander Dies Early MondayHad Been Ill for Past Six MonthsSuffering of Bright’s DiseaseRITES 2 P.M. WEDNESDAY William Alexander, age 48, of Glenlawn, died at 3 o’clock this morning at his home, 704 Euclid avenue, following an illness of six months. Death was caused by Bright’s disease. Mr. Alexander was born in Jackson county May 11, 1880, and had lived in the county all his life. He was married in 1902 to Miss Ollie Martin, of near Brownstown. He was affiliated with the Seymour order of Redmen and Haymakers. The former will be in charge of the funeral services which will be held at the First Baptist church at 2 o’clock Wednesday afternoon, with the Rev. A.. Cohn officiating. Burial will be in Riverview cemetery. The body is in state at the Tower funeral parlors where friends may call between 6 and 9 o’clock this evening. Besides the widow, Mr. Alexander is survived by seven children, Mrs. Della Jaynes, of Seymour; Mrs. Gladys Mails, of Indianapolis; Merill, Lucille, Opal, William Jr., and Norma, all living at home; and a sister, Mrs. Anna Fish, of Norman Station. 6. 1870 US Census, Series: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 277, SS Martin with Cocherham and Allman (1870 U.S. Census)INDIANASeries: M593 Roll: 326 Page: 277. 7. 1900 US Census, Series: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1, MARTIN, SAMUEL S (1900 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, BROWNSTOWN TWPAge: 40, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1. 8. 1910 US Census, Series: T624 Roll: 359 Page: 150, MARTIN, SAMUEL S (1910 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JENNINGS, SPENCER TWPAge: 50, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T624 Roll: 359 Page: 150. 9. Burkholder Funeral Records, Jackson County INGenWeb Archive, http://files.usgwarchives.org/in/jackson/cemetery/burk_4.txtMartin, Samuel S. 733 Age 83y 11m4d d. Jan. 18 1944 Mother's maiden name Polly Ann Allman. 10. 1900 US Census, Series: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1, MARTIN, SAMUEL S (1900 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, BROWNSTOWN TWPAge: 40, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1. 11. Burkholder Funeral Records, Jackosn Counth INGenWeb Arhchive, http://files.usgwarchives.org/in/jackson/cemetery/burk_4.txtMartin, Maggie 511 Age 73y10m 5d d. Feb. 10 1940 Parents Henry Hovis and Elizabeth BohallBurial Riverview. 12. 1920 US Census, Series: T625 Roll: 439 Page: 95, MANNING, JOHN (1920 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, JACKSON TWPAge: 38, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T625 Roll: 439 Page: 95. 13. 1910 US Census, Series: T624 Roll: 357 Page: 122, MANNING, JOHN (1910 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, 1-WD JACKSONAge: 27, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T624 Roll: 357 Page: 122. 14. 1900 US Census, Series: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1, MARTIN, (1900 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, BROWNSTOWN TWPAge: , Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T623 Roll: 378 Page: 1. 15. Burkholder Funeral Records, Jackson County INGenWeb Archive, http://files.usgwarchives.org/in/jackson/cemetery/burk_4.txtManning, Roxie Mae 2599 Age April29 1888 d. May 5 1963 Parents Samuel Martin and Margaret HovisBurial Riverview Cemetery. 16. 1920 US Census, Series: T625 Roll: 439 Page: 177, MARTIN, STANLEY (1920 U.S. Census)INDIANA , JACKSON, OWEN TWPAge: 22, Male, Race: WHITE, Born: INSeries: T625 Roll: 439 Page: 177.

52 Ancestors 52 Weeks - Week 29

John Everett Alexander John Everett was born on January 21, 1873 in Jackson County, Indiana. He was a child of John H. Alexander and M...